North London Partners in health and care
 

Helen's message October 2019

Welcome to the October issue of the STP news, the days may be getting shorter but there is no let up in work going on across north central London as partners look for innovative ways to work together to transform the delivery of health and care services to improve outcomes for residents.

We are looking to expand our pool of experienced LeDeR reviewers (Learning Disabilities Mortality Review). On average women with a learning disability die 26 years younger than the average population and for men the gap is 20 years.  The Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme was established in May 2015 to support local areas across England to review the deaths of people with a learning disability.  By reviewing these deaths, and ensuring the reviews are person-centred, we are able to generate learning in relation to best practice versus poor practice and work with families and our provider services to drive service improvements for people with learning disabilities. If you are a health and care practitioner and are interested email caroline.mcgirr2@nhs.net

During September representatives from provider trusts and clinical commissioning groups attended the second in a series of Outpatient Transformation workshops and heard from Somerset CCG on Patient Initiated Follow Ups and how a pilot, run during 2016/17, recorded 5,009 saved appointments. The Outpatient Transformation Team have pulled together a PIFU Good Practice Slide Pack to help providers have discussions with the Outpatient Transformation Boards on how to implement a PIFU model and which patient cohorts to target. You can get a copy by emailing nclstppmo@nhs.net 

Congratulations to Nicola Akehurst who was recently named National Association of Primary Care Newcomer of the Year for her work on the First Contact Practitioner (FCP) pilot. Nicola is an advanced practice physiotherapist (APP) and APP lead for Barnet and Chase Farm Hospital and has led the FCP pilot that enabled patients suffering from back pain to see an expert immediately without the need for a GP referral. The project is one that developed over many years and it is incredibly rewarding to have it nationally recognised now.

The contribution of retiring and retired primary care practice staff to their communities and the NHS was recognised at a special event held at the Royal College of General Practitioners.  It is the second year that the award ceremony was held and offered an opportunity for the NHS to acknowledge the vital work of those who work in GP practices and to thank them for their commitment to their local communities. You can read about the NCL award recipients here.

Finally I would like to let you all know that I have decided to step down from my post as the North Central London Clinical Commissioning Groups’ Accountable Officer and the NCL Sustainability and Transformation Partnership lead. 

As the CCGs move towards merging, I think it is the right time for me to hand over the reins to my successor to take forward the new organisation.

I first worked in NCL in 2002 and I have really enjoyed living and working on the patch for the last few years. It has been a pleasure to work with the five CCG Governing Bodies, staff and partners across NCL and I want to thank everyone for their support since I have been in this role. We have a great team and have achieved some real improvements in health and care by working together. I am confident that we will go from strength to strength in the future.

Helen Pettersen, North London Partners in Health and Care Convenor